Exercise = Longer Life

OK, so I know I go on and on about the importance of exercise.  But it’s worth reinforcing, especially since our entire modern American culture is geared toward inactivity:  at work (desk jobs) or leisure (TV, computer, or other “screen” of your choice).

The latest scientific research, from the journal Circulation,

More Reasons to Exercise

I’ve often mentioned that exercise is my favorite supplement, since it has so many health benefits.  One of the most obvious benefits of exercise is weight loss, since we burn calories with exercise.  In the balance between reducing food intake and increasing exercise for weight loss, watching food portions generally gives more bang for the buck.

Too Much of a Good Thing

You’ve probably heard a lot (either from me or other sources) about the benefits of vitamin D:  decreased heart disease risk, better blood sugar control, decreased risk of autoimmune disease, less chronic pain and depression…. just for starters.

However, anything can have its downside, and researchers at the American Heart Association found that excess vitamin D levels can lead to greater risk of an abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation.

Ninety Percent of Americans are Missing these Disease-Fighting Powerhouses – Are You?

“What supplement can I take to replace my medication?”
This is a question I hear all the time as a doctor of naturopathic medicine.  People are often surprised when I tell them that I try to use as few pills as possible — whether pharmaceuticals or supplements.  The foundations of health start with a healthy lifestyle:  diet,

Simple Tips for a Healthier Thanksgiving

Ah, Thanksgiving:  the holiday where we pause and reflect on what we are truly grateful for.

Okay, that took about 30 seconds… now bring on the FOOD!

On a day where food plays such a prominent role, remember that even today, moderation can make a big difference.  The easiest place to start is portion size:

  • A serving of meat (such as turkey) is 3 ounces —

Are You Being too Permissive?

In my last entry, I wrote about biology not rewarding our good intentions — it only responds to the actual inputs of a healthy lifestyle (diet, exercise, sleep, stress management).  A particularly interesting phenomenon in this category is what psychologists call “permissiveness.”

You might not have heard this term, but you’re probably familiar with the scenario:  “I just did a 30-minute workout at the gym,

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